Moment female 'Kill the Bill' activist squats at Bristol riot cops' feet then DEFECATES while she takes a selfie - as police are accused of losing control to anarchists because they 'stood by as statues were destroyed'

  • Violent protest took place on Sunday in Bristol against the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
  • A standoff at Bridewell Police Station saw protesters smash windows and set police vehicles alight on Sunday
  • Bill will give police more power to impose conditions on non-violent protests, including for being 'too noisy' 
  • Bill passed its second reading earlier this week, despite public opposition and votes against by Labour MPs  
  • Protests are currently banned under lockdown legislation, which prevents large gatherings from taking place 
  • Bristol Mayor Marvin Rees condemned 'self indulgent, self-centred people coming here looking for a conflict'A female protester at the Kill the Bill riot in Bristol sat down to defecate in front of a police officer it emerged today as the lowest depths of the out-of-control demonstration came to light.

    The revolting act was captured on mobile phone footage as the Avon and Somerset Police force battled to try and keep control of the march.

    It came as questions were asked of them tonight after claiming they had no idea a protest called 'Kill the Bill' could have seen constabulary targeted.

    Members of the public expressed disbelief as Avon and Somerset Police's chief constable insisted he had 'no intelligence' the demo could see an anti-Thin Blue Line riot.

    The force had come under criticism for its handling of Black Lives Matter protests, during which police watched as activists toppled the statue of Edward Colston and hurled it into Bristol Harbour. 

    And today some felt this had paved the way for the protests to get dangerously out of control.

    Former UKIP leader Henry Bolton OBE said: 'The criminal Bristol rioters must be punished, but the police must learn.

    'Allowing mob rule last year encouraged mob rule this year. The officers in footage clearly lack confidence and demonstrate zero decisiveness. There’re poorly trained. Such timidity fuels flames.'

    Military archaeologist Michael Hellis wrote online: 'Violence that broke out during a "Kill The Bill" protest was caused by people who "came for a fight with police", Bristol's chief constable has said.

    'Surely even the Avon and Somerset chief constable realises the significance of the title of this riot. The Old Bill = the police.'

    Ian Acheson, prison and security commentator, added: 'Kill the Bill or Kill the Old Bill? 

    'If you're sheltering under the delusion that this had "anything" to do with defending legitimate protest, you're in the company of people who would have thought it a good night's work if there were human beings inside that van.'

    At least 20 officers were injured as a 'mob of animals' tore through Bristol, setting police vehicles on fire, vandalising NHS workers' cars, hurling fireworks and smashing the windows of a police station in a 'night of thuggery'.  

    But Andy Marsh, chief constable of Avon and Somerset Police, claimed the event had been 'hijacked by extremists' and said there was no 'prior intelligence' that any disorder was planned 'on this scale'. 

    Last night, professional anarchists including one dubbed 'the most dangerous man in Britain' stirred up the protests into a shameful night of violence. 

    Sisters Uncut, who organised Kill the Bill marches in cities around the country, hailed the action. 

    And veteran agitator Ian Bone - the left-wing activist best known for gleefully abusing the children of Jacob Rees-Mogg outside their home - also shared his approval of the violence.

    As pictures of the carnage emerged, he gloated about the fires, attacking the city's mayor who had urged calm: 'All hail the Bristol uprising - Marvin Rees go f*** yourself'. 

    'Bristol always has and will be...riot city.' 

    Critics have suggested police in Bristol were scared to intervene when violence spilled onto the streets, in the aftermath of criticism levelled at Scotland Yard last week.  

    Asked whether the criticism faced by the Metropolitan Police over the vigil for Sarah Everard had made a difference to how his officers behaved, Chief Constable Marsh said: 'Every protest and the police response to it needs to be dealt with in the context of that protest.' 

    He said today: 'A tactical decision was made to deal with these criminals retrospectively and not make a significant number of arrests last night, which would have impacted significantly on our resources at the scene and created a greater risk of damage to property and injuries to the reduced number of officers left to deal with the disorder. 

    The PROFESSIONAL anarchists behind Kill the Bill chaos: How Sisters Uncut group that hijacked Sarah Everard vigil joined forces with career rabble-rousers to bring Bristol to its knees 

    Professional anarchists including one dubbed 'the most dangerous man in Britain' stirred up the Bristol protests into the city's shameful night of violence.

    The perfect storm of protesters, anarchists and troublemakers combined to create disgraceful scenes that saw police attacked and 999 vehicles set ablaze.

    Last night Sisters Uncut, who already organised Kill the Bill marches in cities around the country, hailed the action in Bristol.

    Showing a picture of the demonstrations, they declared: 'In Bristol, thousands attended a protest in defiance of the government's plan to give the police more powers. Thousands said: #KillTheBill!'

    The post online coincided exactly with the separate approval of veteran agitator Ian Bone, best known for harassing MP Jacob Rees-Mogg's children outside their home in a protest.

    On March 16 he had shared a placard which read 'F*** the police' in huge white letters, with the smaller text below 'Crime, sentencing and courts bill'.

    The next day he retweeted the date and time for the protest in Bristol, together with the meeting place. 

    Sisters Uncut was formed in 2014 by activists Janelle Brown and Vicky Ford to support victims of domestic violence, and found fame for stunts including jumping on the red carpet at the West End premiere of the movie 'Suffragette' starring Carey Mulligan and Helena Bonham Carter and later dying the Trafalgar Square fountains red.

    Sisters Uncut say the police are institutionally violent against women and cannot be trusted with women's safety.

    Sisters Uncut has been backed by BLM UK and Extinction Rebellion, who were behind the most high profile protests in Britain over the past few years where police took the knee and were accused of not being tough enough on protesters who ran riot.

    The Bristol Anarchist Federation was also involved in the protests.

    On the eve of the gathering they Tweeted: 'Tomorrow, let's #killthebill Bristol!'

    They then joked about a picture of a skateboarder in front of a burning emergency vehicle: 'When you do a trick so sick that a police van bursts into flame.''There was a hardcore of serious criminals hidden within those 3,000 people - perhaps 400 or 500 people - and we certainly didn't trigger this. 

    'By the time it got to 5.30pm, it became clear that whatever we did we would not be able to avoid a very violent confrontation.' 

    Around 3,000 activists, claiming to protect the right to demonstrate peacefully, had gathered in the city centre on Sunday for the demonstration to oppose plans to give police more powers to deal with non-violent protests. 

    But 500 stayed behind to riot, and police headquarters came under siege as hooded yobs armed with baseball bats tried to smash the windows of the glass-fronted New Bridewell Station, while others attempted to scale the facade and some lobbed missiles at officers. 

    Avon and Somerset police have condemned scenes which saw a police station come under siege

    Avon and Somerset police have condemned scenes which saw a police station come under siege

    'Kill The Bill' protesters were fighting with the police into the early hours of Monday morning after the day of unrest in Bristol

    'Kill The Bill' protesters were fighting with the police into the early hours of Monday morning after the day of unrest in Bristol

    A row of at least nine cars with their windows smashed in the Rupert Street car park in Bristol. All of the cars were parked in bays reserved for NHS workers

    A row of at least nine cars with their windows smashed in the Rupert Street car park in Bristol. All of the cars were parked in bays reserved for NHS workers 

    Pictures taken at the scene and circulating on social media show protesters crouching at the feet of shielded police officers and beginning to defecate, while woman was photographed clearly urinating in front of a row of riot police (pictured)

    Pictures taken at the scene and circulating on social media show protesters crouching at the feet of shielded police officers and beginning to defecate, while woman was photographed clearly urinating in front of a row of riot police (pictured)

    Henry Bolton OBE expressed disbelief police thought nothing like this would happen, given how the Colston statue fell

    Henry Bolton OBE expressed disbelief police thought nothing like this would happen, given how the Colston statue fell

    Ian Acheson questioned whether the name of the movement was a clue as to the thoughts of the troublemakers in Bristol

    Ian Acheson questioned whether the name of the movement was a clue as to the thoughts of the troublemakers in Bristol

    John Hellis said the police should have seen the significance of the name of Kill The Bill given the force nickname Old Bill

    John Hellis said the police should have seen the significance of the name of Kill The Bill given the force nickname Old Bill

    Police chief condemns 'unacceptable' violence at Bristol protests
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    Others were also seen appearing to defecate at the feet of police officers.

    Pictures taken at the scene and circulating on social media show protesters crouching at the feet of shielded police officers and beginning to defecate, while woman was photographed clearly urinating in front of a row of riot police.

    The city's Mayor today described the behaviour as 'pathetic and politically illiterate.' 

    He also slammed the 'self-indulgent, self-centred revolutionary tourists looking for a conflict to take advantage of.' 

    Seven people have been arrested so far - six for violent disorder and one for possession of an offensive weapon.

    One of those arrested during the Bristol riot last night came from 80-miles away, the protester came to Bristol from Reading in Berkshire - an hour and 20-minutes drive down the M4. The other six held are from the Bristol area.

    A total of 20 officers were injured and two were taken to hospital suffering broken bones after being stamped on, pelted with stones and beaten with sticks in the violent skirmishes. One also suffered a punctured lung.

    Chief constable Marsh said 12 police vehicles were damaged, including two that were set on fire, and 'significant damage' was caused to the New Bridewell police station. 

    As a huge clean-up operation gets underway, Bristol Mayor Marvin Rees said the so-called activists were 'a group of people running around the country looking for any opportunity to enter into physical conflict with police or representatives of what they see as the establishment.'   

    And Boris Johnson described the violent scenes that marred the protest in Bristol as 'unacceptable'. 

    Bristol mayor slams rioters after violence seen in the city
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    Police investigators were at the headquarters in Bristol today as an investigation got underway into the riots

    The scene in Bristol today, where graffiti remains on the New Bridewell Street police station

    The scene in Bristol today, where graffiti remains on the New Bridewell Street police station

    One man clashed with members of the press outside Bridewell Police Station in Bristol this morning, after seven arrests were made overnight

    One man clashed with members of the press outside Bridewell Police Station in Bristol this morning, after seven arrests were made overnight 

    A huge clean-up operation is underway this morning, as Bristol Mayor Marvin Rees condemned the violence which marred a protest about the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill

    A huge clean-up operation is underway this morning, as Bristol Mayor Marvin Rees condemned the violence which marred a protest about the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill

    The group was "creating a scene" outside Bridewell police station, where initially about 50 police officers were present

    The group was 'creating a scene' outside Bridewell police station, where initially about 50 police officers were present

    Teams of workers are out in force this morning cleaning up the city after the night of chaos

    Teams of workers are out in force this morning cleaning up the city after the night of chaos 

    Street cleaners work outside the police station the morning after demonstrators clashed with police

    Street cleaners work outside the police station the morning after demonstrators clashed with police

    Keir Starmer: 'Bristol riots were completely unacceptable'
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    Seven people were arrested after a 'Kill the Bill' protest in Bristol turned violent last night

    Seven people were arrested after a 'Kill the Bill' protest in Bristol turned violent last night 

    Rioters set police vehicles on fire as protesters clashed with officers in the shocking scenes last night

    Rioters set police vehicles on fire as protesters clashed with officers in the shocking scenes last night

    Demonstrators stand near a burning police vehicle during a protest against a new proposed policing bill, in Bristol

    Demonstrators stand near a burning police vehicle during a protest against a new proposed policing bill, in Bristol

    A demonstrator skateboards in front of a burning police vehicle during a protest against a new proposed policing bill, in Bristol, Sunday

    A demonstrator skateboards in front of a burning police vehicle during a protest against a new proposed policing bill, in Bristol, Sunday

    A demonstrator gestures in front of a burning police vehicle during a protest against a new proposed policing bill, in Bristol

    A demonstrator gestures in front of a burning police vehicle during a protest against a new proposed policing bill, in Bristol

    A vandalised police van explodes outside Bridewell Police Station, after protesters set it on fire

    A vandalised police van explodes outside Bridewell Police Station, after protesters set it on fire

    A demonstrator gestures near a burning police vehicle as two other vans arrive at the scene to drive protesters away

    A demonstrator gestures near a burning police vehicle as two other vans arrive at the scene to drive protesters away

    The "mob" at the "Kill the Bill" protest in Bristol were "looking for a trigger to provoke a violent response," according to Avon and Somerset police chief constable Andy Marsh (pictured today)

    The 'mob' at the 'Kill the Bill' protest in Bristol were 'looking for a trigger to provoke a violent response,' according to Avon and Somerset police chief constable Andy Marsh (pictured today)

    What is the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill? 

    The 'Kill the Bill' protest in Bristol was organised against the Government's Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, which could see the police handed more powers to tackle demonstrations.

    The wide-ranging proposals, as part of efforts to overhaul the justice system, cut offending and make streets safer, also include laws to reform sentencing, the courts and handling offenders.

    If passed, some of the measures will be UK-wide while others may only apply in England and Wales.

    - What are the key measures proposed in the Bill?

    - Whole life orders for premeditated murder of a child, allowing judges to also hand out the maximum sentence to 18 to 20-year-olds in exceptional cases, like for acts of terrorism leading to mass loss of life.

    - Powers to halt the automatic early release of offenders who pose a danger to the public and end the automatic release halfway through a sentence of serious violent and sexual offenders.

    - Introducing life sentences for killer drivers.

    - Expanding position-of-trust laws to make it illegal for sports coaches and religious leaders to engage in sexual activity with 16 and 17-year-olds in their care.

    - Will the police have more power under the Bill?

    Potentially. The legislation looks to toughen up powers the police have to tackle 'non-violent' protests which are significantly disruptive to the public or on access to Parliament.

    The proposed law includes an offence of 'intentionally or recklessly causing public nuisance'.

    According to the Bill, someone commits this crime if they cause 'serious harm to the public', which can include 'serious annoyance, serious inconvenience or serious loss of amenity'. Those convicted could face a fine or jail.

    The plans could also see police given powers to impose more conditions on static protests, like time and noise limits, and extend the rules to one-person demonstrations.

    Meanwhile, the Government is also seeking to increase the maximum penalty for criminal damage to a memorial from three months to 10 years, under the Bill.

    The laws could also see police have more powers to crack down on unauthorised encampments which interfere with the ability to use the land.

    Officers could also be allowed to stop and search people more if plans for serious violence reduction orders go ahead.

    This would make it easier to carry out checks on those who have previously been convicted of carrying a knife.

    - What about other measures for victims?

    The Bill seeks to reverse bail reforms which led to suspects accused of serious and violent crimes being released without restrictions, and instead imposing conditions if they could pose a risk to victims, witnesses or the public.

    Laws could also be introduced to allow police to obtain search warrants to help find human remains where it is not possible to bring about a prosecution, such as where a suspect has died, is unfit to plead or has already been convicted of the offence in the absence of a body.

    - Are there plans to provide more protection for police officers?

    Yes, Home Secretary Priti Patel wants to double the maximum sentence for assaulting an emergency worker to two years and enshrine a Police Covenant in law to protect serving and retired officers and their families.

    - What are the other measures proposed in the Bill?

    - The amount of time offenders can be subject to curfews could be doubled to two years.

    - A legal duty could be placed on councils, police, criminal justice bodies, health and fire services to tackle serious violence and share intelligence and data.

    - Homicide reviews could be carried out for deaths of adults involving offensive weapons, to try to better understand and prevent violent crime.

    - Profoundly deaf people could be allowed to sit on juries for the first time, by allowing a British sign language interpreter into a jury deliberation room.   

    After a night of violent rioting, it emerged today:

    • Boris Johnson described the violent scenes that marred a 'Kill the Bill' protest in Bristol as 'unacceptable'; 
    • Critics suggested police were scared to intervene in Bristol, in the wake of criticism levelled at Scotland Yard over its handling of the Sarah Everard vigil;
    • Andy Marsh, chief constable of Avon and Somerset Police, claimed Sunday's protest had been 'hijacked by extremists';
    • Ms Marsh said there was no 'prior intelligence' that any disorder was planned 'on this scale';
    • A total of 20 officers were assaulted or injured and two were taken to hospital after suffering broken bones. One also suffered a punctured lung; 
    • 12 police vehicles were damaged, including two that were set on fire, and 'significant damage' was caused to the New Bridewell police station;
    • Seven people have been arrested - six for violent disorder and one for possession of an offensive weapon;
    • Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer said the events in Bristol were 'inexcusable' and 'completely unacceptable'

    Priti Patel criticised the 'anarchic and violent' scenes in Bristol, telling MPs: 'We have been clear that to save lives and fight this pandemic, people must not currently hold large gatherings. Too many this weekend selfishly decided that this did not apply to them.

    'We will always give the police the support and the protection that they need and it is sad, as we saw last week, that the Opposition voted against measures to protect our police and also introduce longer sentences.'

    The Home Secretary also told the Commons: 'The scenes in Bristol yesterday were utterly shameful. We saw criminal thuggery and disorder caused by a minority who put lives at risk.

    'Our exceptional and brave police officers put themselves in harm's way to protect the public. For them to face the criminal violence against them while upholding the law is completely unacceptable.

    'My thoughts are with the injured officers and their family, and I hope that every single Member of Parliament in this House will join me in condemning the shameful actions of the criminal minority involved.'

    Speaking to broadcasters at BAE Systems in Preston, the Prime Minister said today: 'I think all that kind of thing is unacceptable and the people obviously have a right to protest in this country. 

    'But they should protest peacefully and legally.' 

    Avon and Somerset Police Chief Constable Andy Marsh said there was no 'prior intelligence' that any disorder was planned 'on this scale'.

    'No specific organiser was identified prior to the event but we did engage with a number of organisations who had expressed an interest in attending to discourage them due to the current Covid-19 restrictions,' he said.

    'We hoped stressing the sacrifices the Bristol community had made over the past year would deter people from attending.

    'A tactical decision was made to deal with these criminals retrospectively and not make a significant number of arrests last night, which would have impacted significantly on our resources at the scene and created a greater risk of damage to property and injuries to the reduced number of officers left to deal with the disorder.

    'What the public will see now is a huge police investigation in which we'll be gathering evidence from CCTV, body-worn video, social media content and images or video sent in by the public.'

    Asked whether the much-criticised way the Metropolitan Police handled the vigil for murdered Sarah Everard earlier this month had made a difference to how officers behaved in Bristol, Mr Marsh said: 'Every protest and the police response to it needs to be dealt with in the context of that protest.'

    The Met faced widespread criticism for the way it dealt with the vigil in Clapham Common, south London, where officers handcuffed and removed several women who had come out during lockdown in memory of Ms Everard. 

    Chief Constable Marsh told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: 'By the time it got to to 5.30pm, it became clear that whatever we did we would not be able to avoid a very violent confrontation.

    'Once that has happened a handful of officers making a small number of arrests when there is a crowd of 100 damaging vehicles, throwing missiles and throwing fireworks at us - that would not be a good response, that would just put the people who remained in more danger.'

    He added: 'Let's be clear, the wanton violence and destruction had nothing to do with protest - it was committed by those looking for an excuse to commit disorder.

    'The scenes we witnessed yesterday were shameful and I know will be condemned by the whole city.

    'We've received messages of support from across the policing, emergency service and political landscape.

    'No-one wants to see police officers abused or attacked in this way. These men and women put their safety on the line every day to keep the public safe and do not deserve to be on the forefront of this abhorrent criminal behaviour.

    '20 of our brave officers suffered various injuries - including two who suffered more serious injuries which needed hospital treatment.

    'I was at a Bristol station last night and can tell you the feeling of anguish was felt by all our officers and staff at seeing colleagues injured while on the front line.'

    The Mayor of Bristol said he was 'disgusted' with the violence on the streets of his city. 

    He added: 'It also points out the political illiteracy of those people on our streets doing this violence last night. What has injuring police officers, smashing windows, burning cars got to do with the challenges we face as a city right now?' 

    Appearing on Good Morning Britain today, he added: 'What we had last night, there were many people who went out and made their voices heard but there were these group of people, irrespective of the issue they were out there to cause problems for whatever revolutionary fantasy they're playing at.

    'We're not going to let them take away what we've built in recent years. 

    'It would be quite interesting in the mop up, not just to have these people arrested, but to see where they actually come from, because I imagine a few are not actually from this city, but are revolutionary tourists as it were.' 

    Mayor Marvin Rees added: 'There is a debate to be had and there's debate to be had about all proposed Government legislation.

    'But I think there are particular concerns about this Bill and we'll speak about those more on another occasion.

    'But the violence that happened in a city last night goes nowhere to actually reducing the likelihood of this Bill winning support. In fact, it does quite the contrary.

    'People from those communities who have been on the rough end of the criminal justice system are now in more danger. 

    'It doesn't put them closer to justice, it puts them further away. It runs absolutely against what they claim to be in fighting for - political illiteracy at large.'  

    Ian Bone: The lifelong anarchist who 'grew up with an abiding contempt for the upper classes'

    Ian Bone, who lived in Grenfell Tower in the 1980s, with a local North Kensington campaigner in 2017

    Ian Bone, who lived in Grenfell Tower in the 1980s, with a local North Kensington campaigner in 2017

    Veteran activist and grandfather Ian Bone, 71, was once dubbed Britain's most dangerous man after the Class War newspaper he launched in 1982 became so incendiary it featured pictures of beaten up policemen.

    His father was butler to Sir Gerald Coke, grandson of the Earl of Leicester, and the family lived in a bonded cottage on a family estate in Hampshire. 

    Young Ian hated the rich children 'from the big house' for calling his father 'Bone' and grew up with an abiding contempt for the upper classes.

    After finishing a degree in politics from Swansea University, he announced to his horrified parents that his choice of 'career' was to be an anarchist, and that he would fund it by claiming the dole.

    The full-time anarchist – who's been on state benefits since leaving university – now walks with a stick due to Parkinson's disease. 

    Bone has been protesting since the 1980s and is a publisher with class activist publications, Class War and The Bristolian. He became a founding member of Class War, a group dedicated to the violent overthrow of state structures, and published newspapers in support of the cause. 

    At its height it sold 15,000 copies weekly and supported striking miners, dockers, print workers and demos including the Brixton Riots of 1981, before the publication was launched.

    Activist Ian Bone (right, in the flat cap) was filmed accosting the Rees-Mogg family in 2018

    Activist Ian Bone (right, in the flat cap) was filmed accosting the Rees-Mogg family in 2018 

    Bone went on Bash the Rich marches (Bash the Rich is also the title of his autobiography). Just a decade ago he advocated violence to overthrow the state.

    While still a weekly paper, Class War dubbed itself 'Britain's most unruly tabloid'.

    After Prince William's birth in September 1984 it carried a front page picture of him with the headline 'Another f***ing royal parasite'.

    Another front page carried an image of Margaret Thatcher with a hatchet buried in her head. When the paper folded, it carried on as a pressure group. 

    He lived in Grenfell from 1983-1986 and knew several residents who were caught up in the fire there where 72 people died.

    He went on to protest outside The Shard when Grenfell residents weren't being re-housed because there were 10 £50m empty luxury flats inside the state-of-the-art tower. Bone was taken to the High Court by Qatari royal family, owner of The Shard, in February 2018 to stop his protests before their lawyers withdrew their threat of an injunction against him.

    In 2006 he told The Guardian newspaper that violence was key, saying: 'Not (attacking someone) individually, but if you're fighting back as a mob against a particular thing like the poll tax or the Iraq War (then) yes.. If the rich or the ruling class or the police are defending their interests, they deserve everything that's coming to them.'

    When Baroness Thatcher died in 2013, he used his blog to summon an army of followers to celebratory street parties, and published an image of the former prime minister's head being cut open with a meat cleaver. Next to the image he wrote: 'The best cut of all.'

    In other film clips posted on YouTube, he rails against the Royal Family and urges 'violent action' to achieve his aims.

    In 2015 Bone posted pictures of himself angrily brandishing a walking stick during a protest against the so-called gentrification of London.

    He was the key figure behind a mob attack when riot police and helicopters were deployed after more than a thousand people descended on East London to protest against a trendy cafe selling breakfast cereals from around the world for up to £4.40 a bowl.

    And in June 2018 he posted on his own Facebook page in regards to Donald Trump's visit: 'Spend the day idling and drinking around Bond Street/ New Bond street...……..enter shops......handle the goods....be insolent to the rich... insolence comrades...let insolence win the day.' 

    After his unabashed assault on the Rees-Mogg family in 2018, the father-of-five remained silent about his own family.  

    The Mayor said the riot had nothing to do with the 'real everyday struggles' that people in the city face after 12 months of the pandemic.

    'It's selfish, it is self-indulgent and self-centred activity - people living out their revolutionary fantasies,' he said. This has nothing to do with being in lockdown for a year. There are people who go around looking for the latest demo.

    'They look for the opportunity for the flashpoints and I suspect there are a number of people who were here last night who are amongst those. It's got nothing to do with Covid and a lockdown.'

    The chairman of the police federation dubbed the rioters 'a mob of animals' while Home Secretary Priti Patel branded the scenes 'unacceptable' and said 'thuggery and disorder' would never be tolerated. 

    Health minister Helen Whately told Sky News this morning: 'What we've seen in Bristol, those protests were completely unacceptable, just disgraceful behaviour in fact.

    'It was one of these occasions where, if I understand it right, there was a peaceful protest and then a small minority from that protest then turned it very ugly and we saw those scenes of completely unacceptable violence.

    'Not only the damage and the vandalism of police property but, worse still, injuring police officers, so we're seeing officers with serious injuries and going to hospital. That clearly should not happen, it is unacceptable and inexcusable.'

    The Avon and Somerset police and crime commissioner said 'many more' would be arrested in the coming days as officers examined a large amount of CCTV footage from Sunday night's riot.

    Twenty police officers were injured, two seriously, when what started as a non-violent demonstration turned violent after hundreds of protesters descended on the New Bridewell police station.

    Two of these injured were treated in hospital after suffering broken ribs and an arm. Both have since been discharged.

    Police said between 2,000 and 3,000 people had gathered at College Green on Sunday to protest against the Government's Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, which will see the police handed new powers to tackle demonstrations.   

    Home Secretary Priti Patel described the scenes as unacceptable and said 'thuggery and disorder' would never be tolerated.

    Bristol mayor Marvin Rees, who said he had 'major concerns' about the Government's Bill, condemned the thuggery but said the disorder would be used to justify the legislation.

    Sue Mountstevens, police and crime commissioner for Avon and Somerset, said seven people had been arrested so far and there would be 'many more' detained. 

    She said: 'I cannot condemn enough the scenes of violence and destruction that we witnessed yesterday and I know these feelings are felt by the majority of the city and beyond.

    '20 officers were injured last night and this is unacceptable. 

    'These men and women went to work yesterday with public safety as their number one priority and still faced a level of violence that cannot be justified.

    'Such a violent demonstration is shameful at any time, let alone during a pandemic that has seen local people make many sacrifices.

    'Those who clearly acted with intent to cause damage and destruction showed reckless disregard for the safety of local people, police officers and the general community.

    'The financial cost of this to the public is also going to be substantial.'

    Footage captured the descent into anarchy as protesters clashed with police armed with batons and pepper spray. Mounted officers were seen attempting to disperse a large crowd gathered outside Bridewell Police Station.

    Later a group of hooded protesters tried to smash the windows of the glass-fronted police station and another mob set fire to a police van parked in nearby Bridewell Street. 

    Protesters managed to get up onto the roof of the first floor of the police station and rained down missiles on the police, who lined up to defend the entrance of the police station.

    Three police vans were driven into the area, but one was damaged, had its tyres let down and then a fire was built underneath it, burning it out completely as darkness fell.

    In other scenes, officers with police dogs were seen attempting to hold back large crowds as demonstrators scaled the walls of the police station and threw fireworks.

    Other videos and pictures on social media showed dozens of officers in riot gear guarding the entrance to the station and protesters trying to roll a police van daubed with graffiti.

    Shadow home secretary Nick Thomas-Symonds today condemned the 'appalling' and 'completely unacceptable' violence in Bristol.

    He told the BBC news channel: 'Of course, I agree with legitimate protest in a Covid-safe and secure and peaceful way - that is one of the things that is most precious about our democracy - but there is no link between that and the appalling scenes that we saw last night.

    'That violence which we saw last night, which was completely unacceptable, does absolutely nothing for the cause of those of us who are making perfectly legitimate arguments about concerns around the Policing Bill which in the way that it seeks to limit protests.'

    Meanwhile Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer said the events in Bristol were 'inexcusable' and 'completely unacceptable'.

    The former director of public prosecutions said he hoped those responsible for the violence were brought to justice.

    'I hope that the perpetrators are identified and prosecuted where that's appropriate,' Sir Keir told LBC Radio.

    Darren Jones, the Labour MP for Bristol North West, said: 'You don't campaign for the right to peaceful protest by setting police vans on fire or graffitiing buildings.' 

    People watch a burning police vehicle during the protest, which has become violent with protesters attacking a police station

    People watch a burning police vehicle during the protest, which has become violent with protesters attacking a police station

    Bristol Mayor slams 'political illiteracy' of 'revolutionary tourists' who turned out in force to smash up his city

    Bristol Mayor Marvin Rees, pictured on GMB this morning, said he was 'disgusted' with the violence on the streets of Bristol

    Bristol Mayor Marvin Rees, pictured on GMB this morning, said he was 'disgusted' with the violence on the streets of Bristol

    Bristol Mayor Marvin Rees said he was 'disgusted' with the violence on the streets of Bristol.

    'We're disgusted at what happened in the city and absolutely condemn the actions of those people who brought violence and destruction to our city last night,' he said.

    'It also points out the political illiteracy of those people on our streets doing this violence last night. What has injuring police officers, smashing windows, burning cars got to do with the challenges we face as a city right now?

    'As we come out of Covid-19, we face economic depression, we have to secure jobs for people, tackle child hunger, build homes for people. It's got nothing to do with the struggles in this city and I wouldn't even mention these people in the same breath as the very legitimate debate that there is over this Bill.'

    Appearing on Good Morning Britain today, he said: 'We're disgusted and I absolutely condemn what's gone on.  

    'I draw a hard line between those people out smashing up my city and the bill, they've got nothing to do with the bill, they're a group of people running around the country looking for any opportunity to enter into physical conflict with the police or representatives of what they see as the establishment whether it's the bill, whether it's some other protest they'll take the opportunity.' 

    He added: 'What we had last night, there were many people who went out and made their voices heard but there were these group of people, irrespective of the issue they were out there to cause problems for whatever revolutionary fantasy they're playing at.

    'We're not going to let them take away what we've built in recent years. It would be quite interesting in the mop up, not just to have these people arrested, but to see where they actually come from, because I imagine a few are not actually from this city, but are revolutionary tourists as it were.

    'They are self-indulgent, selfish, self-centred, what they've done has nothing to do with the bill and in fact as everyone's been pointing out, it will be used as evidence by people who want to support the bill. They've no strategy, they've no connection to any real politics it's just taking the opportunity to express their emotions of whatever distorted source they have.

    'Being a black man, I'm from a community that's disproportionately likely to end up on the wrong side of the criminal justice system and receive unfair treatment from the system, if they make the bill more likely, it does not bring me closer to justice, it pushes justice away. Myself, my brothers and sisters, people from traditionally poor communities, they've done nothing to support us, nothing in line with what we've done in the last few years to feed our children to house people who don't have homes, take care of people coming out of the criminal justice system.

    'They haven't turned up for that, they've just turned up to smash up our city and that's unacceptable.'

    A vandalised police van on fire outside Bridewell Police Station, as other police vehicles arrive

    A vandalised police van on fire outside Bridewell Police Station, as other police vehicles arrive

    Riot police, with police horses and police vehicles, move down Rupert Street in Bristol towards protesters

    Riot police, with police horses and police vehicles, move down Rupert Street in Bristol towards protesters

    Woman protester is pinned down by police 

    Police officers arrest a female protester near the Monument in Newcastle city centre yesterday afternoon

    Police officers arrest a female protester near the Monument in Newcastle city centre yesterday afternoon

    A separate event for Reclaim the Streets - who are protesting violence against women in the wake of Sarah Everard's death in London - also took place in Newcastle yesterday.

    Pictures show a large group gathering and a female protester being pinned to the ground by four police officers.  

    She was told to move and when she refused, police responded by taking her to the floor, where she was handcuffed before being put in a van.

    In a video shot at the scene close to Grey's Monument in the city, the woman is visibly distressed and screaming as she is bundled into the back of the police vehicle.    

    It is understood the woman was standing on her own when she was approached by the police more than an hour before it was set to start.

    Andy Roebuck, chairman of the Avon and Somerset Police Federation, said: 'Disgusting scenes in Bristol by a mob of animals who are injuring police officers, members of the public and damaging property.

    'Avon and Somerset Police Federation are attending stations to support officers. We have officers with suspected broken arms and ribs. This is so wrong.'  

    Chief Superintendent Will White of Avon and Somerset Police said: 'What started out as a peaceful protest has been turned by a small minority into violent disorder.

    'Officers have been subjected to considerable levels of abuse and violence. One suffered a broken arm and another suffered broken ribs. Both have been taken to hospital. At least two police vehicles have been set on fire and damage has been caused to the outside of the station.'

    He added: 'We have requested mutual aid from neighbouring forces to bring this incident to a safe conclusion.' 

    This morning, a spokesperson for Avon and Somerset Police said: 'I can confirm seven arrests have been made overnight.

    'We will now be carrying out a significant investigation to identify all those responsible. There were in region of 12 officers injured - with two taken to hospital with serious injuries. We will be carrying out high profile patrols today.'

    Bristol Mayor Marvin Rees added: 'Smashing buildings in our city centre, vandalising vehicles, attacking our police will do nothing to lessen the likelihood of the Bill going through.

    'On the contrary, the lawlessness on show will be used as evidence and promote the need for the Bill. This is a shameful day in an incredible year for Bristol.'

    He warned: 'Being a black man, I'm from a community that's disproportionately likely to end up on the wrong side of the criminal justice system and receive unfair treatment from the system, if they make the bill more likely, it does not bring me closer to justice, it pushes justice away.' 

    He added: 'The violence and damage that have emerged from the protests are unacceptable and have nothing to do with the real work we are doing to tackle political, economic and social inequality.

    'I recognise the frustrations with the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill.

    'I have major concerns about the Bill myself, which is poorly thought-out and could impose disproportionate controls on free expression and the right to peaceful protest.

    'It also misses as much as it includes, such as measures that could reduce violence against women and girls. We will raise our concerns.

    Protester kicks a smashed Bridewell Police Station window as police officers inside barricade the way , in Bristol, Sunday

    Protester kicks a smashed Bridewell Police Station window as police officers inside barricade the way , in Bristol, Sunday

    Protester smashes a Bridewell Police Station window as they take part in a 'Kill the Bill' protest in Bristol, demonstrating against the Government's controversial Police and Crime Bill

    Protester smashes a Bridewell Police Station window as they take part in a 'Kill the Bill' protest in Bristol, demonstrating against the Government's controversial Police and Crime Bill

    Police officers inside Bridewell Police Station recording protesters on the roof outside

    Police officers inside Bridewell Police Station recording protesters on the roof outside

    Police hold back people outside Bridewell Police Station as they take part in a 'Kill the Bill' protest in Bristol, Sunday

    Police hold back people outside Bridewell Police Station as they take part in a 'Kill the Bill' protest in Bristol, Sunday

    Protestor uses a skateboard to protect himself from a police officer's baton in Bristol during a confrontation Sunday

    Protestor uses a skateboard to protect himself from a police officer's baton in Bristol during a confrontation Sunday 

    'We have faced times of great confrontation, particularly surrounding Black Lives Matter and the events that followed. We have had numerous protests.

    'Our police, city representatives and I have been able to point out with pride that we have faced these moments of conflict without the physical conflict that others have experienced.

    'Those who decided to turn today's protest into a physical confrontation and smash our city have robbed us of this.

    'What they have done has more to do with self-gratification than it has to do with the protection and advancement of those of us from communities most likely to be marginalised and mistreated by our political and legal systems.'

    Thangam Debbonaire, Labour MP for Bristol West and shadow secretary of state for housing, said: 'This is absolutely unacceptable.

    'The scenes of violence and direct attack on the police in Bristol city centre will distress most people including anyone who believes in defending the right to peaceful democratic protest.' 

    John Apter, national chairman of the Police Federation of England and Wales, said: 'This is not about protecting the right to protest, it's violent criminality from a hardcore minority who will hijack any situation for their own aims.

    'My colleagues, some of whom are now in hospital, face the brunt of that hatred. Thoughts remain with my colleagues.'  

    Demonstrators throw objects from the top of Bridewell Police Station in Bristol  which has been defaced during the protest

    Demonstrators throw objects from the top of Bridewell Police Station in Bristol  which has been defaced during the protest

    A close up of protesters on the roof of Bridewell Police Station as police watch from inside

    A close up of protesters on the roof of Bridewell Police Station as police watch from inside

    Demonstrators graffiti a police shield during the Bristol protest against a new proposed policing bill

    Demonstrators graffiti a police shield during the Bristol protest against a new proposed policing bill

    Protestors attack a police van which is then set on fire as police clash with protesters outside Bridewell Police Station

    Protestors attack a police van which is then set on fire as police clash with protesters outside Bridewell Police Station

    Demonstrators stand near a police vehicle which has been defaced, during the protest against a proposed policing bill

    Demonstrators stand near a police vehicle which has been defaced, during the protest against a proposed policing bill

    Mr Roebuck later told the BBC: 'This is the worst violence in Bristol for many, many years. It's really unprecedented violence. Between four and six or possibly more officers are seriously injured and some have broken bones. No one had any indication it would erupt this way.'

    The Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, introduced to the Commons this month, would give officers in England and Wales more power to impose conditions on non-violent protests, including those deemed too noisy or a nuisance.

    Those convicted under the proposed legislation could face a fine or jail. The Bristol protesters were carrying signs reading 'say no to UK police state' and 'freedom to protest is fundamental'.

    Police had advised people not to attend the protest due to coronavirus legislation, which bans mass gatherings.

    Home Secretary Priti Patel tweeted Sunday evening: 'Unacceptable scenes in Bristol tonight. Thuggery and disorder by a minority will never be tolerated.

    'My thoughts this evening are with those police officers injured.'     

    Riot police, with police horses and police vehicles, move down Rupert Street in Bristol towards protesters as violence continues into the evening

    Riot police, with police horses and police vehicles, move down Rupert Street in Bristol towards protesters as violence continues into the evening

    Riot police, with police horses behind them, move down Rupert Street in Bristol towards protesters

    Riot police, with police horses behind them, move down Rupert Street in Bristol towards protesters

    A demonstrator graffitis a police vehicle whilst another lies under the van, in Bristol Sunday

    A demonstrator graffitis a police vehicle whilst another lies under the van, in Bristol Sunday

    Police officers with police dogs face protesters outside Bridewell Police Station as they take part in a 'Kill the Bill' protest

    Police officers with police dogs face protesters outside Bridewell Police Station as they take part in a 'Kill the Bill' protest

    Hundreds gathered in Bristol city centre to demonstrate against a controversial Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill which would give the police in England and Wales more power to impose conditions on non-violent protests, including those deemed too noisy or a nuisance.   

    The demonstration, which begun on College Green, turned violent after protesters set a police van alight and threw fireworks and 'projectiles' towards officers. 

    Police donned riot gear and brought in dogs and horses to control the growing crowds as tensions rose into the evening.

    The 'mob' then gathered around Bridewell Police Station where protesters were filmed smashing through the building's windows with a baton and rocks. Police were seen protecting the station from the inside whilst filming perpetrators.

    Those convicted under the proposed legislation could face a fine or jail. Mass gatherings are currently banned under coronavirus legislation and anyone breaching the regulations could be fined. 

    Protesters carried placards with slogans such as 'The Day Democracy Became Dictatorship' and 'We Can't Be Silenced That Easy'.   

    Avon and Somerset Police had urged people not to attend the demonstration - warning that enforcement action could be taken.  

    Demonstrators launch fireworks at police officers during the protest in Bristol, with footage showing some protesters fleeing to safety

    Demonstrators launch fireworks at police officers during the protest in Bristol, with footage showing some protesters fleeing to safety

    Fireworks are launched as police officers with dogs arrive to the protest in Bristol city centre

    Fireworks are launched as police officers with dogs arrive to the protest in Bristol city centre

    Demonstrators stand in front of a police station's smashed windows during the Bristol protest as officers protect the building

    Demonstrators stand in front of a police station's smashed windows during the Bristol protest as officers protect the building

    Police hold back people outside Bridewell Police Station as they take part in a 'Kill the Bill' protest in Bristol

    Police hold back people outside Bridewell Police Station as they take part in a 'Kill the Bill' protest in Bristol

    Demonstrators stand in front of a police station during a protest against a new proposed policing bill, in Bristol

    Demonstrators stand in front of a police station during a protest against a new proposed policing bill, in Bristol

    Protesters set fire to a vandalised police van outside Bridewell Police Station

    Protesters set fire to a vandalised police van outside Bridewell Police Station